In the summer of 2004, I was in a workshop at Hollyhock in BC when my son, then about 28, said, “Dad, you can’t stay indoors all week in weather like this. Why don’t you play hooky for one afternoon and let me show you how my generation has fun.” (more…)

Memo to the Millennials

You find yourself in a large organization that does not seem to be designed with your needs in mind. You need work with purpose and the freedom to do it your way. You want work that aligns with your desire to make the world better and need the opportunity to make a significant contribution without having first to wait in line until you are 50. You need the freedom to choose projects to work on and to make decisions without frustrating delays waiting for permission.

I understand, but if your bosses were looking at this list they might say, “What have you been smoking? Real life isn’t like that. Grow up.”

Given how corporations work, you are asking a lot. You are asking management for freedom, protection from the bureaucracy and support. Giving you what you want costs them time, political capital, and hassle. Why should they go through all that for you and your idea?

The good news is this: For reasons that you might have seen in the Memo to the CEO, your employer desperately needs innovation.

Your employers need you to bring in information from the edge, out beyond where corporations are comfortable and figure out what it means in terms of what the corporation can do to remain relevant, to do what matters, to get the jump on what comes next. They need your courage to keep exploring. They need the right kind of crazy, wild, but sensing how to connect aspirations to the possible.

As an intrapreneur you are part of a revolutionary movement to reshape how humans work together in large groups.

We are just discovering how to make freedom work to produce an exquisite and dynamic order rather than chaos. This is the next step to produce a steep change in organizational effectiveness. Intrapreneurship and cooperation are two keys. You are part of this transition.

What guides humans out beyond where AI can go is not something that can be put in a slide deck or explained to a committee. Contrary to the operating beliefs of most corporate cultures, the most effective driver of innovation is heart coupled with mind in an intimate dance.

To get the exquisite human guidance system needed for rapid and cost effective innovation corporations have to trust their intrapreneurs to find the path through all the obstacles, mistakes and disappointments on the way to finding the pattern of success.

They must free employees to do what they can see needs to be done, not just to follow a script or standard operating procedure. And employees must rise to the challenge of being worthy of that trust.

Be a member of one of those liberated teams who are co-creating the future. Let this memo be an inspiration to help you to be effective in earning the right to innovate and in delivering the goods.

This memo is a call to greatly increasing your chances of getting to make your dreams happen. It will not be easy. There will be dark days when you barely have the will to go on. But you will also get to win some of the time and in those times to make a big difference.

This article is part of a series of memos to the different stakeholders of intrapreneurship. Stay tuned for the memo to middle managers, women intrapreneurs and older intrapreneurs.

 

Gifford Pinchot III is an American entrepreneur, author, inventor, and President of Pinchot & Company. Gifford is credited with inventing the concept of and word “intrapreneur” in a paper that he and his wife, Elizabeth Pinchot, wrote in 1978 titled Intra-Corporate Entrepreneurship. His first book, Intrapreneuring: Why You Don’t Have to Leave the Corporation to Become an Entrepreneur (1985) presented an expansion of the intrapreneurship concept.
Memo to the CEO

Although addressed to you, this memo will be read by your employees, who will begin implementing intrapreneuring with or without your support. It will go better for you and your shareholders if you get involved in building the environment for intrapreneuring.

The young talent you need to drive innovation is not buying the old social contract between corporation and employee. They are demanding work that is personally meaningful, work that is aligned with their environmental values and/or concern for social justice. They expect substantial freedom to make decisions and the opportunity to make major contributions early in their careers.

In essence, they are demanding an intrapreneurial career. If you don’t meet their needs, they will stay with you only long enough to get trained and put your company on their résumé. Many of the best of your older employees have similar attitudes and needs. If their needs are not met they may retire on the job or leave to start their own firm.

Though these independent attitudes do cause problems, if you understand how to manage them, these intrapreneurial attitudes can work strongly in your favor. Your intrapreneurial employees, young and old, can deliver the radical increases in the volume, quality and cost effectiveness of innovation that you need to deal with today’s disruptive economy.

How serious is the need for intrapreneurs today?

  1. Almost every industry is being or will soon be disrupted by exponentially evolving technologies such as artificial intelligence, machine learning, genetics, nanotechnology, 3D printing, robotics, online learning, online marketing and social networking. According to Deloitte, “In the next ten years 50% of the S&P 500 will be replaced by digital disrupters.” The new game is disrupt your industry or be disrupted. Don’t be roadkill.
  2. Acquisition has proved to be no substitute for internal innovation. Two years after I sold our software business for $2.3 million dollars per employee, not one of my former employees was still working for the acquiring company. Unless you can maintain an intrapreneurial culture in the businesses you buy, their value declines rapidly.
  3. The world is unstable. Natural disasters such as hurricanes, flooding and droughts are increasing. There are increasing numbers of failed states. Subcultures are changing rapidly. You will need people close to the ground in many geographies and many subcultures to read what is going on and respond rapidly and creatively. This means empowering yet more intrapreneurs.
  4. Big companies now innovate in partnership with startups and other entrepreneur-led firms.  To co-innovate with entrepreneurial firms you need to come close to matching their ability to experiment, learn and change at warp speed. You can only be an effective partner to entrepreneurial firms if the relationships are managed on your side by intrapreneurs who are free to act rapidly without being second guessed by bureaucrats.

So what can you do?

You may think you can get breakthrough rates of innovation through suggestion programs, stage gate processes or the like.

You can’t.

Dr. William Souder spent ten years studying 289 innovations in 53 different companies hoping to discover a process that could drive innovation success. He could not find one. Instead his primary conclusion was, “The intrapreneur is an essential ingredient in every innovation.” The system inevitably resists innovations that take resources from or threaten to replace the existing ways of delivering value to customers. Significant innovation only happens when a committed team of intrapreneurs drives the innovation though all the barriers, failures, mistakes and seizing of emerging opportunities that mark the intrapreneurial journey.

It is not the right process that makes an organization innovative. It’s the close and trusting relationships between self-motivated intrapreneurs and their management sponsors that moves innovations forward through the inevitable resistance of any corporate system. Sponsors coach the intrapreneurial teams, protect them and help them access resources. Good sponsors can recognize the real intrapreneurs from the “promoters,” who look and sound good, but don’t get the job done.

Creating an intrapreneurial organization will not only give you a major competitive advantage and profitable growth, it will also create the legacy of happy, deeply engaged employees, suppliers and partners committed to your company’s well being. As a side benefit it will also make a large positive impact on society’s major problems. In total, this is a legacy that Wall Street will celebrate and, at the same time one you can be proud to explain to your grandchildren.

 

This article is the first in a series of memos to the different stakeholders of intrapreneurship. Stay tuned for the memo to middle managers, millennials, women intrapreneurs and older intrapreneurs.  

 

Gifford Pinchot III is an American entrepreneur, author, inventor, and President of Pinchot & Company. Gifford is credited with inventing the concept of and word “intrapreneur” in a paper that he and his wife, Elizabeth Pinchot, wrote in 1978 titled Intra-Corporate Entrepreneurship. His first book, Intrapreneuring: Why You Don’t Have to Leave the Corporation to Become an Entrepreneur (1985) presented an expansion of the intrapreneurship concept.
Four Definitions for the Intrapreneur

The origin of the term “intrapreneur” came from a white paper titled “Intra-Corporate Entrepreneurship” which was written by myself and my wife Libba for the Tarrytown School for Entrepreneurs in the Fall of 1978. That paper led to rigorous debate, the coining of the term intrapreneur, and eventually publishing of the book “Intrapreneuring” in 1985.

In the 30 years since this book was published, the term intrapreneur has taken on a life of its own with many meanings and uses. How is “intrapreneur” being defined today? Wikipedia defines intrapreneurship as “the act of behaving like an entrepreneur while working within a large organization”

Here are four more definitions to consider in 2017.

Four Definitions:

1. Intrapreneurs are employees who do for corporate innovation what an entrepreneur does for his or her start-up.

Intrapreneurs are the yeast that makes the bread rise. If you want more innovation the only way to get it done is to identify, develop, trust and empower your intrapreneurs. An organization must know how to select, manage and create the environment for intrapreneurs for them to thrive.

 

2. Intrapreneurs are the dreamers that do.

Intrapreneurs don’t just come up with ideas, their core role is turning ideas into success business realities. In fact, intrapreneurs sometimes are not the inventor, but they are always the implementer of new ideas. In this case their dreaming is not about coming up with the idea, but rather dreaming the pathway to turn them into a profitable realities.

In 1983, 3M’s chairman, Lew Lehr, said:

For many years the corporate structure [at 3M] has been designed specifically to encourage young entrepreneurs to take an idea and run with it. If they succeed, they can and do find themselves running their own business under the 3M umbrella.

The entrepreneurial approach is not a sideline at 3M. It is the heart of our design for growth.

Contrast this 3M philosophy with many of the so called “intrapreneurship programs” I have seen, which don’t get the doing part of the intrapreneurial role. They run idea contests or even accelerators to turn the ideas into business plans, and then turn the ideas over to someone else for implementation. That rarely works. You need intrapreneurs to turn good ideas and even good plans into a successful reality.

 

3. Intrapreneurs are self-appointed general managers of a new idea.

If you are passionate about an idea, begin an intrapreneur means doing something to move it forward. They don’t wait for someone to put them in charge. They build a team of volunteers. Find cheap ways to test the idea in the marketplace. They build rapid prototypes, which means making something that helps others to visualize what they are talking about. Beginning with cardboard mockups or static screen shots, they create something quick and easy.

As the general manager they show the rapid prototype to customers and make it better. Making it on the cheap lets them change it when they learn what customers really need and want.

To get management support, they show potential sponsors and customers responding enthusiastically to an idea. In the words of Winston Churchill’s graduation speech, intrapreneurs “Don’t give up. Don’t give up. Don’t give up.”

 

4. Intrapreneurs are drivers of change to make business a force for good.

An intrapreneur who focuses on innovations that make the world better may be known as a “social intrapreneur.” Social intrapreneuring is not just doing good. It often leads to disruptive innovations and highly profitable new businesses.

Some social intrapreneurs focus on innovations that address environmental problems. Others focus on innovations that extend the benefits of society to the less fortunate. Still others focus on health and a host of other benefits. When successful they all help their companies “to do well by doing good.”

The social intrapreneurs biggest challenge may be how to make your “doing good” motivated idea profitable for the company. By doing so the intrapreneur not only gets to start, but also to scale the idea and its impact.

Social intrapreneuring is becoming popular with millennials because it serves their desire to bring deep purpose and self-direction into their business careers. If a company is struggling with attracting, motivating and retaining millennials, supporting social intrapreneurs is the highway to millennial engagement. Stay tuned to learn how to engage your intrapreneurial talent with the challenges that matter to your business as well as to the larger world.

 

Gifford Pinchot III is an American entrepreneur, author, inventor, and President of Pinchot & Company. Gifford is credited with inventing the concept of and word “intrapreneur” in a paper that he and his wife, Elizabeth Pinchot, wrote in 1978 titled Intra-Corporate Entrepreneurship. His first book, Intrapreneuring: Why You Don’t Have to Leave the Corporation to Become an Entrepreneur (1985) presented an expansion of the intrapreneurship concept.
The Complex Sale

In most significant innovations, one person cannot say yes by themselves. Not only do many staff groups and functions have a veto, but the big decision makers rely on advisors who can kill a deal even they have no authority of their own. Some of the people who need to be onboard include:

The Economic Buyer

  • Who pays the bill and/or gives final approval

The User Influencer

  • Who will supervise or use what you are selling
  • Who will judge the impact on their area
  • Who will let the economic buyer know whether they approve

The Technical Influencer who might be in:

  • Technology
  • Legal
  • Purchasing
  • HR, etc.
  • Those kind of people often have veto power

The Coach or Sponsor

  • Who guides you in finding and converting other influencers
  • Trusts you
  • Is credible
  • Wants your solution

*Adapted from The New Strategic Selling by Heiman and Sancheziut

The technology advisor to the economic buyer often has particularly interesting criterion. It is in their interest to be seen as ahead of the curve in understanding the new things coming down the pike. Therefore you serve their interests by working with them early on before many others have heard about your solution.

Paradoxically this means, for example, that they will appreciate seeing any new computer applications while they are still full of bugs, because that means they are seeing it before it becomes generally known. You are showing them respect by sharing with them before you would let others see your prototype. Doing so also means they have a chance to give you advice that will make the idea better.

Next Week

Next Monday’s post: We begin a series of influence techniques identified by Robert Cialdini. The first is “Public Declaration.”

Posts in this Series:

How to Sell Your Ideas

Express Gratitude

Avoid Triggering the Organizational Immune System

It’s Only a Test

Framing Ideas so they Get Support

Restarting the Clock

Don’t Run it up the Flagpole to See Who Salutes

The Risk of Not Doing It

Handling Objections

 

Gifford Pinchot III is an American entrepreneur, author, inventor, and President of Pinchot & Company. Gifford is credited with inventing the concept of and word “intrapreneur” in a paper that he and his wife, Elizabeth Pinchot, wrote in 1978 titled Intra-Corporate Entrepreneurship. His first book, Intrapreneuring: Why You Don’t Have to Leave the Corporation to Become an Entrepreneur (1985) presented an expansion of the intrapreneurship concept.